Volume 7 Supplement 1

20th Brazilian Diabetes Society Congress

Open Access

Young leaders doing diabetes education in a school

  • Matheus Chaluppe de Oliveira1,
  • Ronaldo José Pineda Wieselberg1Email author,
  • Mark Thomaz Ugliara Barone1,
  • Patrícia Vieira de Luca1 and
  • Viviana Giampaoli1
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome20157(Suppl 1):A185

https://doi.org/10.1186/1758-5996-7-S1-A185

Published: 11 November 2015

Background

Although type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases in children, school staff and students know very little about it. Most of what they know are misconceptions, like: “the person who has it cannot eat sugar”, or “it is a disease of old people”. Due to this lack of knowledge, they sometimes refuse to have students with DM, to assist them with their self-care routine, or are unable to help in an emergency. One of the Brazilian Young Leaders in Diabetes (YLD) made, as its conclusion YLD Training project, a diabetes information campaign in his former school.

Materials and methods

In addition to the speech in 6 classrooms (126 students, grades 8th-12th, ages between 13 and 17 yrs., 44% boys and 56% girls), 4 pamphlets were made and placed on the school dashboards (about: hypoglycemia, DM symptoms, and invitation to the speech). A questionnaire was used before and after the speeches. It contained multiple choice questions about: existence of a family member with DM; appropriate help for someone with DM who is shaking, dizzy, pale and nervous; frequency of sports practice; behaviors that help in preventing type 2 DM; if it is possible to cure DM or not; and if he/she had DM. There was also an open-ended question about DM symptoms. Wilcoxon signed rank test with the continuity correction was used to compare the pre- and post-speech number of right and wrong answers to each question.

Results

There was only 1 student with T1D. Most of them (63%) reported to have a family member with DM (20% no family member with DM, and 17% did not know). In addition, 49% practice physical activity 3 or more times a week, 29% only once a week, and 22% do not practice. The 4 questions compared pre- and post-speech presented significant difference in terms of higher number of correct answers after the speech, all of them with a p-value < 0.001.

Discussion

Our objectives were partially achieved, since after the speech most of the students, but not all, answered correctly the questions about: hypoglycemia correction (percentage of right answer pre- and post-speech: 21% and 64%), type 2 DM preventive behaviors (62% and 78%), diabetes symptoms (10% and 71%), and DM possibility of cure (49% and 91%).

Conclusion

We believe that led by a Young Leader the project may be more effective, because the connection with someone from a closer age group and language may enhance students' interest.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Young Leaders In Diabetes (IDF/ADJ)

Copyright

© de Oliveira et al. 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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