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Table 3 Multivariate analysis of cancer mortality with metabolic syndrome by sex

From: Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for cancer mortality in the general Japanese population: the Jichi Medical School Cohort Study

  Men Women
Without MetS With MetS Without MetS With MetS
MetS participants, n (%) 3973 (88.4) 522 (11.6) 6406 (91.1) 622 (8.9)
Cancer deaths 418 55 251 46
Parson-Years 71,444 9418 120,718 11,654
Cancer mortality
 Crude mortality (/1000 person-years) 5.9 5.8 2.1 3.9
 HR-Agea (95% CI) 1.0 (reference) 1.11 (0.84–1.48) 1.0 (reference) 1.69 (1.23–2.31)
 HR-Allb (95% CI) 1.0 (reference) 1.21 (0.90–1.62) 1.0 (reference) 1.69 (1.21–2.36)
< 65 years old
 Crude mortality (/1000 person-years) 3.3 3.8 1.3 2.4
 HR-Agea (95% CI) 1.0 (reference) 1.14 (0.80–1.61) 1.0 (reference) 1.70 (1.14–2.55)
 HR-Allb (95% CI) 1.0 (reference) 1.22 (0.84–1.77) 1.0 (reference) 1.66 (1.09–2.55)
≥ 65 years old
 Crude mortality (/1000 person-years) 2.6 2.0 0.8 1.5
 HR-Agea (95% CI) 1.0 (reference) 1.09 (0.68–1.74) 1.0 (reference) 1.71 (1.03–2.83)
 HR-Allb (95% CI) 1.0 (reference) 1.19 (0.73–1.95) 1.0 (reference) 1.69 (0.99–2.89)
  1. MetS metabolic syndrome, HR hazard ratio, CI confidence interval
  2. aHazard ratios adjusted for age
  3. bHazard ratios adjusted for age, smoking status (never, past, or current smoker), alcohol drinking status (never, past, or current drinker), marital status (yes or no), educational attainment (≤ 15, 16–18, or ≥ 19 years), physical activity (low, middle, high), occupation category (white-collar, blue-collar, or no working), and menopausal status (pre or post) only in women