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Table 3 Prevalence of the various metabolic syndrome risk factors among the study population classified by sexual function

From: Association between metabolic syndrome and sexual dysfunction among men with clinically diagnosed diabetes

Variable Total (n = 274) NSD (n = 84) SD (n = 190) P value
WHO     
Central Obesity – WHR 210(76.6%) 58(69.0%) 152(80.0%) 0.0482
Raised fasting glucose 274(100.0%) 84(100.0%) 190(100.0%)  
Hyperlipidaemia 131(47.8%) 36(42.9%) 95(50.0%) 0.2751
Raised blood pressure 163(59.5%) 47(56.0%) 116(61.1%) 0.4278
NCEP ATP III     
Abdominal Obesity – WC 53(19.3%) 13(15.5%) 40(21.1%) 0.2813
Raised fasting glucose 274(100.0%) 84(100.0%) 190(100.0%)  
Raised Triglyceride 88(32.1%) 25(29.8%) 63(33.2%) 0.5788
Raised blood pressure 200(73.0%) 54(64.3%) 146(76.8%) 0.0309
Reduced HDL-C 78(28.5%) 21(25.0%) 57(30.0%) 0.3978
IDF     
Abdominal Obesity – WC 178(65.0%) 52(61.9%) 126(66.3%) 0.4804
Raised fasting glucose 274(100.0%) 84(100.0%) 190(100.0%)  
Raised Triglyceride 88(32.1%) 25(29.8%) 63(33.2%) 0.5788
Raised blood pressure 200(73.0%) 54(64.3%) 146(76.8%) 0.0309
Reduced HDL-C 78(28.5%) 21(25.0%) 57(30.0%) 0.3978
  1. Data are presented as proportion with corresponding percentages in parenthesis. The proportions were compared using Fischer’s exact test.