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Table 2 Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and metabolic score among the studied population stratified by sexual function

From: Association between metabolic syndrome and sexual dysfunction among men with clinically diagnosed diabetes

Variable Total (n = 274) NSD (n = 84) SD (n = 190) P value
Prevalence of MetS     
WHO 216(78.8%) 64(76.2%) 152(80.0%) 0.4766
NCEP ATP III 119(43.4%) 35(41.7%) 84(44.2%) 0.6953
IDF 142(51.8%) 43(51.2%) 99(52.1%) 0.8889
Prevalence of clustering of components of MetS  
WHO     
0 0(0.0%) 0(0.0%) 0(0.0%)  
1 11(4.0%) 4(4.8%) 7(3.7%) 0.6752
2 46(16.8%) 16(19.0%) 30(15.8%) 0.5059
≥3 217(79.2%) 64(76.2%) 153(80.5%) 0.4149
NCEP ATP III     
0 3(1.1%) 0(0.0%) 3(1.6%) 0.2469
1 46(16.8%) 13(15.5%) 33(17.4%) 0.6992
2 107(39.1%) 34(40.5%) 73(38.4%) 0.7478
≥3 118(43.1%) 32(38.1%) 86(45.3%) 0.2692
IDF     
0 1(0.4%) 0(0.0%) 1(0.5%) 0.5053
1 20(7.2%) 8(9.5%) 12(6.3%) 0.3466
2 87(31.8%) 31(36.9%) 56(29.5%) 0.2231
≥3 166(60.6%) 49(58.3%) 117(61.6%) 0.6122
  1. Data are presented as proportions; P value defines the level of significance when subjects with no sexual dysfunction (NSD) were compared to those with sexual dysfunction (SD) (Fischer’s exact test).